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Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery
September 2022 Newsletter

an online gallery located in Bodega Bay, California, with our showroom in Graton, California
open by appointment and online,
call or text 707-875-2911, email Art@BodegaBayHeritageGallery.com


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from Linda Sorensen
available at the Jenner Inn
Sonoma Coast Art & Wine
Sept 10 & 11, 10-4

Goat Rock (and Roll) Goat Rock State Beach, Jenner 18 x 24
Goat Rock (and Roll)
Goat Rock State Beach, Jenner
18 x 24

Winslow Homer, The Life Line
Winslow Homer: A Look Back
to an Exhibition at the
Art Institute of Chicago, 2008

Linda Sorensen in her studio, ready for Art Trails, 2022
Art Trails 2022
Linda Sorensen's Studio
Atelier One, Graton, CA

Painting of the Month
Charles S. Graham 1852--1911

Mountain Path and Conifers
Watercolor, 11 7/8 x 8 3/4


Ad Banner for Winslow Homer, The Color of Light exhibition at the Art Instititue of Chicago, 2008
Winslow Homer: A Look Back to an Exhibition at the
Art Institute of Chicago, 2008

by Daniel Rohlfing
Last Month's article ...
Edward Hopper, Self Portrait
Edward Hopper,
A Look Back to a 2008 Exhibition
at the Art Institute of Chicago
Back in the Spring of 2008, Linda and I attended two side-by-side exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago. One was entitled "Edward Hopper," and the other "Watercolors by Winslow Homer: The Color of Light."

Below are many of the Winslow Homer paintings on exhibit. Last month, we featured the paintings from the Edward Hopper exhibition.
It was quite the event! Art lovers from across the nation and beyond flocked to Chicago. Linda and I sought out a low cost flight to Midway and found a hotel deal at the Loop's famous Silversmith Hotel, just a short stroll to the Art Institute of Chicago.
Photo portrait of Winslow Homer, 1880, 44 years old Photo by Napoleon Sarony, 1821-1896
Photo portrait of Winslow Homer, 1880, 44 years old
Photo by Napoleon Sarony, 1821-1896

Winslow Homer is regarded by many as America's greatest painter of the 19th century.

Although there is no record of Winslow Homer's ever meeting Mark Twain, their lives and careers are strikingly parallel. They were born a year apart, Twain in 1835, Homer in 1836. Both explored the American experience. Both were influential to artists who followed them. Both died in 1910.

Homer was mostly a self taught artist, although he learned a great deal of technique from his mother, a skilled amateur watercolorist in her own right. He apprenticed as a lithographer in Boston. In 1861 at the age of 25, he was a free-lance Civil War illustrator-correspondent for Harper's Weekly. He became an adept visual storyteller, skilled at symbolism and nuance within American Realism. Throughout his career, he was unparalleled in his ability to tell stories visually.

He is known for his paintings of New England, the Maine Coast, and the Caribbean. His earlier illustrations of The Civil War and the Reconstruction period were most impactful showing both the violent action and extreme tedious boredom of soldiering, and demonstrating a deep understanding of and compassion for America's African Americans, both during slavery and afterward in Reconstruction.

His influence extended to the artists of the Ashcan School, artists Robert Henri, George Luks, William Glackens, John Sloan, and Everett Shinn. A bit later, he was admired by George Bellows and Edward Hopper as well as the famed illustrator N.C. Wyeth, his son Andrew Wyeth and grandson Jamie Wyeth.

Growing up in the midst of New England's abolitionist movement, young Winslow Homer experienced the fire and passion of those demanding an end to slavery. By the time of the Civil War, Homer's opinions and passions on the subject of abolition had been forged and sharpened. In his Civil War and Reconstruction pictures, he exhibits an enormous sensitivity and depth of compassion when he depicts the plight of recently freed slaves. The weight of their condition is mixed with his optimism for their future. His images shows their character in the face of hardship, and their worthiness and dignity as people.

30 Most Famous Winslow Homer Paintings
a brief 3 min video produced by WinslowHomer.org
Winslow Homer and the Civil War
Although photography existed during the Civil War, it was still in its infancy, impractical for reporting on an active army in the field. Illustrators were still the best option. By 1861, Winslow Homer was a seasoned illustrator. He was chosen, one of 30 or so artists to be embedded with the Union Army charged with the task of reporting on the war for an emerging visual press.
Winslow Homer, Calvary Charge, 1862 Wood Engraving, Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Winslow Homer, Calvary Charge, 1862
Wood Engraving, Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Winslow Homer, Sharpshooter, 1863 Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Winslow Homer, Sharpshooter, 1863
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Homer was not just a skilled artist, he was a keen and thoughtful observer. In observing and recording battle scenes, he had to be daring, quick on the draw so to speak, and able to face the rigors of possible injury, starvation, and disease. The work was dangerous and tiring. Homer made two or three extended visits to the front. He traveled to Alexandria, Virginia in 1861, sketching the 6th Pennsylvania Calvary. He spent two months with the New York 5th Infantry in Virginia near Fort Munroe. and he was in Yorktown with "Duryee's Zouaves" (a group of Union soldiers who dressed like the Zouaves, a light infantry regiment of the French Army located in North Africa.)

Homer never depicted dead soldiers nor did he glorify battle. Homer's battle scenes showed the adrenalin drenching horror of war, the fierceness of close quartered combat where men slashed, stabbed and raged onward or fell to a gruesome death. His best known painting is Sharpshooter, known by its longer title The Army of the Potomac - A Sharp-Shooter on Picket Duty. In this picture, the sharpshooter is balanced uncomfortably on a branch lining up a target through his scope. He does not glorify the sharpshooter. Homer merely depicts him as grim technician. Homer later wrote of sharpshooters, "I always had a horror of that branch of service."
Winslow Homer, Home Sweet Home, 1863 National Gallery of Art. Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.
Winslow Homer, Home Sweet Home, 1863
National Gallery of Art, The Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.
Winslow Homer, On Guard, 1864 Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, On Guard, 1864
Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Like most soldiers, Homer grew a beard during the war. Shaving in the field was a luxury. He wore dirty clothes and endured a soldier's diet. He witnessed a bayonet charge at the Battle of Seven Pines, and witnessed a field hospital where surgeons dealt with the wounded with all their amputations and deaths. In the long tedious periods between battle scenes, Homer pictured the long periods of boring camp life, men opening Christmas boxes from home, tugging on the wishbone after an Army Thanksgiving dinner, and men playing football in camp.

He was liked by the soldiers, but not so much by the officers who questioned the accuracy of his illustrations. But through his illustrations, thanks to Harper's Weekly, his scenes of the war were seen near and far. His reputation and fame grew. Winslow Homer was known throughout America and even as far as London.

Winslow Homer,The Veteran in the Field, 1865 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Winslow Homer,The Veteran in the Field, 1865
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

Winslow Homer,Croquet Scene, 1866 The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer,Croquet Scene, 1866
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
After the war, Homer addressed the issue of transition, how soldiers returned home and assumed their lives in peacetime. Most poignant of these paintings was the Veteran in the Field. Here, a returning soldier has put down his uniform and weapons, and now swings his blade harvesting wheat. In Croquet Scene, well dressed women engage in a leisurely game of croquet, a quiet recreational activity which would not have happened with the deprivations of war.
Winslow Homer, Prisoners from the Front, 1866 Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Winslow Homer, Prisoners from the Front, 1866
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Winslow Homer, Army Teamsters, 1866 Colby College Museum of Artt, Waterville, ME
Winslow Homer, Army Teamsters, 1866
Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, ME

Here Dr. Beth Harris, Bev Purdue Jennings and Dr. Christopher Oliver discuss Army Teamsters
by Winslow Homer at the at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA

Winslow Homer and scenes of Gloucester, Massachusetts, 1873
Boston to Gloucester
Gloucester, 24 miles NE of Boston
Glaucester's Atlantic House Hotel, where Winslow Homer stayed while painting in Glaucester
Atlantic House, Gloucester, Massachusetts
Before air conditioning, New Yorkers fled the city to escape the hot summers. Homer was no different. He chose the seaside town of Gloucester, Massachusetts, about 25 miles northeast of Boston. In the years after the Civil War, the city was a busy seaport, featuring a large fishing fleet and shipyards. The town's population exploded in the summers with throngs of vacationers taking the train up from New York and Boston. For Homer, this meant a ripe market for painting sales. He chose to work in watercolor as it would allow him to rapidly produce finished works for sale. While in Gloucester, Homer stayed at the centrally located Atlantic House.
Winslow Homer, Boy in a Boatyard, 1873 Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Winslow Homer, Boy in a Boatyard, 1873
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Winslow Homer, Boy with Anchor, 1873 Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH
Winslow Homer, Boy with Anchor, 1873
Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH
Homer chose to paint what other artists weren't painting. Rather than paint the fishing fleet leaving and returning to the harbor, Homer painted children, playing about the docks and in the shipyards.
Winslow Homer, Dad's Coming, 1873 Narional Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.
Winslow Homer, Dad's Coming, 1873
National Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.
Winslow Homer, Dad's Coming, 1873 The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, Dad's Coming, 1873
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
|Winslow Homer, How Many Eggs, 1873 Karen A. and Kevin W. Kennedy Collection, New York, NY|Winslow Homer, How Many Eggs, 1873
Karen A. and Kevin W. Kennedy Collection, New York, NY
A subject he painted multiple times were scenes of boys waiting for the return of their fathers from fishing.

It was a theme Homer used in some of his paintings during the Civil War, including On Guard (pictured above with the Civil War paintings).

In Gloucester, fishermen would remain out of port for weeks, and some were lost at sea. A father's return would have been a big deal in the life of a Gloucester boy.
Winslow Homer, Glaucester Harbor 1873 The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO
Winslow Homer, Gloucester Harbor 1873
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO
Winslow Homer, Three Boys in a Dory with Lobster Pots, 1873 The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO
Winslow Homer, Three Boys in a Dory with Lobster Pots, 1873
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO
Winslow Homer,The Whitling Boy, 1873 Terra Foundation of Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer,The Whittling Boy, 1873
Terra Foundation of Art, Chicago, IL
Reconstruction and Homer's sensitive portrayal of the freed slaves
In his own time, when Homer first exhibited his paintings of Reconstruction, they were praised by critics. He was admired for the serious sensitivity he brought for the condition of America's freed slaves. But, in the South, any criticism from the north was deeply resente, including Homer's artistic sympathetic sensitivity. In the North, some art critics found Homer's treatment of the subject of Reconstruction refreshingly different from other artists who dared to address the subject.
Winslow Homer, Contraband, 1875 The Arkell Museum at Canajoharie, New York
Winslow Homer, Contraband, 1875
This soldier's uniform identifies him as one of "Duryee's Zouaves."
The Arkell Museum at Canajoharie, New York

Looking back from a 21st century perspective, his reconstruction paintings have a dignity about them, a welcoming quality towards these newly minted citizens. Homer had heard the debates of the evils of slavery his entire life. His mother had been a member of an abolitionist church in Boston. Homer had a front row seat to witness and experience the cost of freeing the slaves, the long hard carnage. Now that the fighting was over, his paintings show a warmth, a compassion for these new Americans.

Winslow Homer,Weary, 1878 Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer,Weary, 1878
Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, The Busy Bee, 1875 Private Collection
Winslow Homer, The Busy Bee, 1875
Private Collection
Winslow Homer, Two Boys in a Wagon, 1875 Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
Winslow Homer, Two Boys in a Wagon, 1875
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
Personally, I really love Taking Sunflower to Teacher -- what heart! I believe Homer believed that this boy's newfound freedom was about to take root.

The sunflower and a monarch butterfly metaphorically tell this boy's current state as a newly freed slave, but they also hint at his future. The butterfly exhibits fragility, but immense beauty and strength. The sunflower has undeniable dazzling beauty, yet as it tenaciously and quickly grew, it followed the light and burst forth with beauty.

Somehow, when looking at this boy, we see him dressed in rags, but he won't stay that way for long. His current state will pass, his beauty and strength will emerge, and his stature will quickly grow in the light of freedom.
 Winslow Homer,Taking Sunflower to Teacher, 1875 Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Winslow Homer,Taking Sunflower to Teacher, 1875
Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Jeffrey Richmond-Moll discuss Taking Sunflower to Teacher
by Winslow Homer at the Georgia Museum of Art.
Homer in the Bahamas, some winters, 1884 - 1905

Between 1884 until 1905, Winslow Homer often wintered in the Caribbean. He was drawn by the warm weather, the fishing and the subject matter for painting. Over this 21 year period, Homer explored Florida coastal areas including Key West, and he even made it to Cuba and Bermuda.

Winslow Homer, A Garden, Nassau, 1885 Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, A Garden, Nassau, 1885
Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer,The Conch Divers, 1885 Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN
Winslow Homer,The Conch Divers, 1885
Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN

Homer eagerly met the painting challenges of capturing the crystal clear light, the turquoise waters, and the vividly green plant life. His depictions of the dark skinned native population reveal their personal character and grace. Homer often painted pictures showing the dangers of living with the sea, the human encounters with sharks and the resultant wreckage of being on the water during a hurricane. These paintings still evoke responses in people today nearly 150 years later.

Winslow Homer,Sharks (The Derelict), 1885 Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Winslow Homer,Sharks (The Derelict), 1885
Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Winslow Homer,Under the Coco Palm, 1898 Harvard University Art Museums, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, MA
Winslow Homer,Under the Coco Palm, 1898
Harvard University Art Museums, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, MA
Winslow Homer, The Water Fan, 1898-99 The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, The Water Fan, 1898-99
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer,The Sponge Diver, 1898-99 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, MA
Winslow Homer,The Sponge Diver, 1898-99
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, MA
In the Bahamas, Homer sought out local people, doing what he had done before in his career, seeking to find truthful scenes of daily life. To capture the dazzling bright sunlight, Homer developed his Caribbean watercolor style, using transparent washes in free and confident brushstrokes, using the whiteness of the paper to show through to great effect.
Winslow Homer,West India Divers, 1898-99 Spencer Museum of Art, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KA
Winslow Homer,West India Divers, 1898-99
Spencer Museum of Art, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KA
Winslow Homer,After the Hurricane, 1899 Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer,After the Hurricane, 1899
Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, The Gulf Stream, 1899 The Art Institute of Chicagot, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, The Gulf Stream, 1899
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
In After the Hurricane, Bahamas Homer tells the visual drama of a fisherman who survived a hurricane. This scene is the aftermath of what must have been a harrowing experience.

The fisherman's wrecked boat has come to rest on the sand next to him. The fisherman is equally ravaged and exhausted. As the fisherman sleeps and begins to revive, in the distance, we see receding black storm clouds and whitecaps as the roiling surf begins to calm down and return to normal.

In a way, this painting recalls similar themes used by Homer during the Reconstruction period. Then too, he told a tale of the aftermath of an unspeakable horror.
Winslow Homer, The Gulf Stream, 1899 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Winslow Homer, The Gulf Stream, 1899
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Homer in France and England
Winslow Homer, Haymakers, 1867 Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, Haymakers, 1867
Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
After the Civil War, Winslow Homer traveled to France in 1867. His painting Prisoners from the Front (pictured above in the Civil War section of this article) was on exhibit at the Exposition Universelle in Paris.

Homer did not study in Paris, but did draw scenes of Parisian street life for Harper's. He also did some oil painting. Homer was most impressed with the Barbizon painters, especially Jean-François Millet and his paintings of French peasants, and newer French artists Edouard Manet and Gustave Courbet.

In 1881, Homer traveled to England, spending a brief time in London before heading up the coast nearly to Scotland, setting up an extended 18 month long residency in Cullercoats, a seaside fishing village.
Winslow Homer, Hark the Lark, 1882 Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI
Winslow Homer, Hark the Lark, 1882
"Fisherwomen of Cullercoats"
Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI
In Cullercoats, Homer was really interested in the disappearing life of the fisherfolk. Many of his paintings featured "fisherwives." He depicts them as hardworking somber and unfancy, going about their daily tasks, and enduring the risks their husbands faced as they went to sea.

During his year and half in Cullercoats, Homer called the Room 17 of the Hudleston Arms his home. He established and maintained his studio across the street, with unobstructed views of the waterfront and the sea.
Winslow Homer,The Houses of Parliament, 1881, Hirshhorn  Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.
Winslow Homer,The Houses of Parliament, 1881, Hirshhorn
Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.
Homer at home, his seaside studio and home in Prouts Neck, Maine
Winslow Homer,The Life Line, 1884 Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
Winslow Homer,The Life Line, 1884
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
Critics immediately recognized Homer's The Life Line as a brilliant work, perhaps Homer's greatest painting. Surrounded by raging waves approaching the rocky shore, the rescuer holds tightly to a woman, seemingly unconscious, as the ropes, tackle and pulley edge them closer to safety. The hero's face is hidden by the woman's blowing red scarf.
Winslow Homer's Home and Studio Prouts Neck, Maine, 1883-1910
Winslow Homer's Home and Studio, overlooking the sea
Prouts Neck, Maine, 1883-1910
Winslow Homer, West Point, Prouts Neck Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA
Winslow Homer, West Point, Prouts Neck
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA
Winslow Homer, On the Lee Shore, 1800 Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI
Winslow Homer, On the Lee Shore, 1900
Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI
Homer moved to Prout's Neck soon after his year and a half in Cullercoats, England. He had had enough of city living. One critic described him as "Robinson Crusoe, cloistered on his art island, a hermit with a brush."

Homer's small home was a carriage house on his family's estate, located about 6 miles south of Portland, Maine, and about 90 miles NE of Boston. It was just 75 feet from the shore. Homer hired a Portland architect to create a studio and comfortable living space. He added a second story porch, which homer called "the piazza" to paint in the open air. The summers were lovely, but the winters were bleak and solitary. Homer got through the winters with hard work, and frequent trips to Boston, New York, or the Caribbean.

He painted many scenes of the sea at Prouts Neck, many with sturdy figures of men and women who faced the hardships of living with the sea. Although Homer received high praise for his seascapes, his work did not receive the high prices and fame of John Singer Sargent's more flattering portraits. But painting nature and people's struggle to live with nature was what he wanted to capture.

PBS Newshour: Winslow Homer's long love affair with the sea
Jared Brown of Boston's WGBH reports.

Paintings done upstate NY, the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and in New York State's Adirondack Mountains
Winslow Homer, Setting a Squirrel Trap, 1858, Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, the Smithsonian, New York, NY
Winslow Homer, Setting a Squirrel Trap, 1858, Cooper-Hewitt
National Design Museum, the Smithsonian, New York, NY
Winslow Homer, Artists Sketching in the White Mountains, 1868 Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Winslow Homer, Artists Sketching in the White Mountains, 1868
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME

Besides the places and events covered above, the artist painted in Upstate New York at various times of his life. With Winslow Homer, it was most always about nature and the adventure of meeting it head on. As a young artist of 22, he created a graphite, brush and watercolor drawing of two boys setting a squirrel trap in the woods of upstate, New York.

In Artists Sketching in the White Mountains, Homer shows three painters painting outdoors under a gray sky. Homer was then 32 years old and vacationing in the White Mountains.

Winslow Homer, Mount Washington, 1869 The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, Mount Washington, 1869
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, Apple Picking, 1873 Tera Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, Apple Picking, 1873
Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, IL
In 1869, Homer was on assignment for Harper's Weekly to write about the White Mountains, a region becoming dominated by tourists, with new railroads, new hotels and well groomed paths. Here stylishly dressed ladies ride on horseback.

Apple Pickers was painted on Houghton's Farm, near Mountainville, NY. The farm was owned by Homer's most important patron, Lawson Valentine. Homer created fifty watercolors and several drawings and studies at the farm.
Winslow Homer, The Guide, 1889 Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Winslow Homer, The Guide, 1889
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Winslow Homer, After the Hunt, 1892 Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Winslow Homer, After the Hunt, 1892
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Beginning in 1870, Winslow Homer made many trips to New York's Adirondack Mountains. The mountains, the old forest, the lakes, rivers and ponds provided what Homer cherished most, privacy, abundant subjects to paint, and excellent fishing.

In 1892, Homer did a number of watercolor portraits of his guide Rufus Wallace, who's ruggend appearance matched his surroundings.
Winslow Homer, The Rapids, Hudson River, Adirondacks 1894 The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, The Rapids, Hudson River, Adirondacks 1894
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, Canoe in Rapids, 1897 Fogg Art Museum, Harvad University, Cambridge, MA
Winslow Homer, Canoe in Rapids, 1897
Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
One of the most memorable aspects of Homer's Adirondack whitewater paintings was his ability to render a liveliness to the water. These are exciting paintings to see, as visually stimulating. as if you could hear the rushing waters splash and shower you as you balance your way along in a canoe. And for anyone who has ever caught a large mouth bass with a top water lure or fly, it is a thrill. Homer enjoyed fishing, from the sharks of the Caribbean to the bass in the Adirondacks. This jumping bass reveals a glimpse into Homer's own sense of joy being out in the wild.
Winslow Homer, Shooting the Rapids, 1902 Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Winslow Homer, Shooting the Rapids, 1902
Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Winslow Homer, Life-Size Black Bass, 1904 Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Winslow Homer, Life-Size Black Bass, 1904
Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Archived overview of the exhibition, Art Institute of Chicago | Back to the Top

Linda Sorensen ... two upcoming events
1. Sonoma Coast Art and Wine Festival ... Jenner Inn, Jenner. Sat & Sun, Sep 10 & 11, 10-4
2. Art Trails 2022, Linda's Studio at Atelier One, Graton, Sat & Sun Sept 24--2, and Oct 1--2, 10-5
Linda Sorensen in her Studio, Christmas, 2021
JENNER - WAVES OF COMPASSION, SONOMA COAST ART & WINE: This first September event, benefiting our local Coast charity Waves of Compassion, will include wine tasting to raise funds for the charity, plus exhibit and sale by several artists in different media, with a portion of proceeds to the charity. BBHG's Linda Sorensen will be featured by Sonoma Coast Art at Jenner Inn on Highway One in Jenner on our beautiful Coast, the upcoming weekend of September 10 and 11, from 10:00a.m. to 4:00p.m. Participating in-person artists are photographer Fracesca Scalpi, painters Linda Sorensen, Deb Titus and Georgia Bourdens, and jeweller Christine Paschal; five other artists' fused glass, jewelry, and ceramics will also be displayed.
Sonoma Coast Art and Wine 9/10/22 Sonoma Coast Art and Wine 9/10/22
Cover Art, Sonoma County Art Trails catalog, 2022

SONOMA COUNTY-WIDE - ART TRAILS: The second September event-set begins with preview exhibits that are already or will soon be underway. The open studios of Sonoma County Art Trails, a juried program of Sebastopol Center for the Arts ("SCA"), will be September 24-25 and October 1-2. Hours are 10:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. except that there is a 4:00p.m. early closing on September 25.

We hope you enjoy the event, and that we get to see you at Linda's studio. Linda thanks with great affection the 400 people who visited in early June at her artist studio at Atelier One, Studio #5 (first floor, south end), 2860 Bowen St. in Graton, during Art@theSource 2022. Five artists including Linda are participating in Art Trails at Atelier One (Art Trails #19, #38, #39, #40, #41), and a total of 117 professional artists are participating this year.

The Art Trails preview at Corrick's in Santa Rosa has already begun and will have a closing reception October 7; the preview at SCA in Sebastopol will start September 10 and have its reception September 16; and the preview at Gallery One in Petaluma will start September 8 with its reception September 17.

Collector's Guides are being distributed by mail, and will be available at major distribution points, at SCA, and from participating artists. The online Collector's Guide is available at sonomacountyarttrails.org

Linda and most of the participating artists are available by appointment year-round, which is a reason to hold onto your copy for a while, to access contact information. COLLECTOR'S GUIDES remain online for the whole year until the next catalog takes its place, on the website for the event.

Waves of Compassion | Sonoma Coast Art . com | Sonoma County Art Trails | Linda's ETSY Shop | Linda's website | Back to the Top


Our Painting of the Month,
Charles S. Graham, 1852-1911, Mountain Path and Conifers,
dedication "to my friend Cowles / C. Graham"
Charles S. Graham, Mountain Path and Conifers, watercolor
Charles S. Graham, Mountain Path and Conifers
(a scene of the Sierra Nevada)
dedication, "To my friend, Ccwles, C. Graham"
11 7/8 x 8 3/4
Charles S. Graham, Mountain Path and Conifers, watercolor
Examples of prints of SF by Charles S. Graham
examples of late 19th century scenes of San Francisco
by Charles S. Graham
Like Winslow Homer, Charles S. Graham was a free lance illustrator whose drawings were reproduced in "Harper's Weekly" and other major publications of the late 19th century.

Charles S. Graham was 16 years younger than Winslow Homer and died just a year after Homer. His work appeared in nearly every issue of Harper's from 1880 through 1892.

As a young artist, Graham was equally at home with pen and ink, oil or watercolor. An adventurer, he headed west. To pay his way, he did drawings for the Northern Pacific Railroad. Back east, he painted theatrical scenery in New York and Chicago. In 1883, the young 31 old artist often was in residence in San Francisco and was a member of the Bohemian Club and the San Francisco Art Association.
In San Francisco, he is known for the many pen and ink prints he created of the city before the 1906 quake. In 1883, he was present for the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. In 1887, he did a scene of Yellowstone published in Harper's Weekly. Charles was an adventurer. Unlike Albert Bierstadt who produced glorified often unrealistic views of nature, Graham prefered to render what was before him.
Charles S. Graham's page on our site | Back to the Top

Gallery Notes

The Flower Carrier
, 1935

An Exhibition Opportunity for you in San Francisco

Diego Rivera's America
through January 2, 2023
at SFMOMA


150 artworks from the pinnacle of Diego Rivera's career -
paintings, frescoes, drawnings, murals

Memorium: A long time beloved member of the Santa Rosa Art Community has died, Micah Schwaberow.
He was one of the founding members of ArtTrails, well known for his exceptional wood block prints. A selection of his works is on view and available for sale at Corricks on Fourth Street in Santa Rosa and at the Ren Brown Collection in Bodega Bay.

Micah Schwaberow on the coast
Micah Schwaberow 1948-2022
Info card about Micah Schwaberow at Corricks in Santa Rosa
Micah Schwaberow, A Wish
A Wish
Micah Schwaberow, Waater Dance
Water Dance
Micah Schwaberow Daybreak, Elkorn Slough
Daybreak, Elkhorn Slough
from our Aug 2022 issue
Edward Hopper, Self Portrait
Edward Hopper,
A Look Back to a 2008 Exhibition
at the Art Institute of Chicago

NEW EDWARD HOPPER EXHIBITION
Edward Hopper’s New York

Oct 19, 2022 - March 5, 2023
The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Last month, we looked back at a phonemenal Edward Hopper exhibition held at the Art Institute of Chicago in 2008. Now, a new major Edward Hopper exhibition is to be held in New York. Hopper lived in New York for almost 60 years. This exhibition at the Whitney Museum looks at Hopper's paintings of New York. And yes, Night Hawks will be there!

Link to the Whitney's Hopper Exhibition page

Auction prices for LA artist Ernie Barnes skyrocket!
Three years ago in September of 2019, we published an article of a retrospective exhibtion of work by Ernie Barnes at the California African American Museum (link below). His work was most impressive.

Since then, his painting The Sugar Shack sold for 15.3 million at Christie's in New York. Solid Rock Congregation (1993) will be sold at Bonhams September 9.

from ouir Sep 2019 issue
Earnie Barnes Retrospective
Ernie Barnes Retrospective
LA's California
African American Museum

Sold for 15.3 million at Christie's in New York
Ernie Barnes, The Sugar Shack

Up for auction, September 9 at Bonhams
Ernie Barnes, Solid Rock Congregation

in Bodega Bay
Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery Showroom Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery Showroom
Art Trails 2022
Linda Sorensen's ART TRAILS OPEN STUDIO
Sat & Sun, Sepember 24-25, 10-5
Sat & Sun, October 1-2, 10-5
open other times by appointment in Graton or Bodega Bay
http://www.BodegaBayHeritageGallery.com | Call or Text 707-875-2911
email: Art@BodegaBayHeritageGallery.com

Joshua Meador Mendocino Coast
"Mendocino Coast"
Joshua Meador
Ren Brown
Ren Brown
The Ren Brown Collection
1781 Coast Highway One, Bodega Bay, 94923
707-875-2922 |  rbc4art@renbrown.com
http://www.renbrown.com | Back to the Top
Reb Brown Sign Thumbnail

Linda Sorensen Peak, south of Hopland, CA

Linda Sorensen Paintings

You may meet Linda and view her paintings at her studio in Graton by appointment,
or arrange to see specific paintings at other locations. Linda paints colorful and imaginative
landscapes emphasizing design and influenced by abstraction and Post-Impressionism.

LindaSorensenPaintings.com | 707-875-2911

Linda Sorensen at her easel, photo by John Hershey
\Jean Warren Sand Harbor
Bodega Bay's Jean Warren Watercolors
Bodega Bay resident Jean Warren says her paintings are reflections
of the places she has lived and traveled.
Jean is a signature member of the National Watercolor Society,
California Watercolor Association and full member of Society of Layerists in Multi-Media.

http://www.JeanWarren.com / 707-875-9240

Jean Warren Watercolor

What's nearby?
in Sonoma, Napa & Marin Counties
Sebastopol Center for the Arts IN SEBASTOPOL - Sebastopol Center for the Arts
... see website for on-line activities
home of Sonoma County's Art @ the Source and Art Trails
282 S. High Street, Sebastopol, CA 95472  707.829.4797
Hours when able to reopen: Tue - Fri 10am - 4pm, Sat & Sun 1 - 4pm
Corricks Kevin Brown
Corrick's Keven Brown
IN SANTA ROSA
Corrick's Art Trails Gallery | http://www.corricks.com/arttrailsgallery
637 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 | Contact:: http://www.corricks.com/contact-us

Corrick's has been a Santa Rosa Treasure since 1915,
a downtown stationery store serving the community's "cultural hub."
Corrick's has long supported local artists with its impressive "ART TRAILS GALLERY,"
including paintings by Linda Sorensen.
Corricks offers a number of originals by famed Santa Rosa artist, Maurice Lapp ... (see our August 2017 article)

located on Fourth Street, steps away from Santa Rosa's revitalized town square
and Fourth Street's Russian River Brewery
Corricks
BBHPhoto Dennis Calabi
Dennis Calabi
IN SANTA ROSA- Calabi Gallery | http://www.calabigallery.com

We are located at 456 Tenth Street in Santa Rosa.
Contact us with any questions at (707) 781-7070 or info@calabigallery.com
456 Tenth Street, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 | email: info@calabigallery.com | 707-781-7070
Famed master conservator Dennis Calabi brings his rare knowledge and experience
to present a tasteful and eclectic array of primarily 20th century artwork.

http://www.calabigallery.com | Back to the Top
Easton Crustacean Dancing Dream 144
Easton, Crustacean Dancing Dream, American Alabaster
Annex Galleries Santa Rosa IN Santa Rosa - The Annex Galleries
specializing in 19th, 20th, and 21st century American and European fine prints
The Annex Galleries is a member of the International Fine Print Dealers Association (IFPDA).
http://www.AnnexGalleries.com | Back to the Top
Rik Olson

IN GRATON - Graton Gallery
OPEN Weekends, see website for up to date information
home of many of Sonoma County's best artists
http://www.gratongallery.com
Sally Baker, Tim Hayworth, Bruce K. Hopkins,
Rik Olson, Susan Proehl, Sandra Rubin, Tamra Sanchez, 11Mylette Welch
Graton Gallery | (707) 829-8912  | artshow@gratongallery.com
9048 Graton Road, Graton CA 95444 | Open Saturday and Sunday check website

Christopher Queen Gallery IN DUNCANS MILLS - Christopher Queen Galleries
3 miles east of Hwy 1 on Hwy 116 on the Russian River
http://www.christopherqueengallery.com |707-865-1318| Back to the Top
Paul Mahder Gallery Thumbnail IN Healdsburg - Paul Mahder Gallery
http://www.paulmahdergallery.com

(707) 473-9150 | Info@paulmahdergallery.com
222 Mill Healdsburg Avenue, Healdsburg, CA 95448 | check for hours
Petaluma Arts Council Art Center

IN PETALUMA - Petaluma Arts Center
"... to celebrate local artists and their contributions and involve the whole community"

Petaluma Center for the Arts

Links to current museum exhibits relevant to Early California Art
The Greater Bay Area
The Walt Disney Family Museum
-- see website for details
This museum tells Walt's story from the early days.
(on the Parade Grounds) 104 Montgomery Street,
The Presidio of San Francisco, CA 94129

-- view location on Google Maps
--
Disney Museum Exterior Thumbnail San Francisco
... see website
de Young Museum
Permanent Collection
De Young Museum Thumbnail
San Francisco
closed, see website
California Historical Society


California Historical Society Thumbnail San Francisco
Legion of Honor

... see website
-Permanent European and Impressionist Paintings
San Francisco Legion of Honor Museum
San Francisco
open, see website for details
Contemporary Jewish Museum

San Francisco's Contemporary Jewish Museum Thumbnail Oakland
... see website
Oakland Museum of California

-- ongoing Gallery of California Art
-showcasing over 800 works
from the OMCA's collection
Oakland Museum Thumbnail

San Francisco
SFMOMA

Diego Rivera's America
through Jan 2, 2023
http://www.sfmoma.org

SF Museum of Modern Art

Santa Rosa
...
see website
The Museums of Sonoma County

Sonoma County Museum Thumbnail
Santa Rosa
... see website
Charles M. Schultz Museum

Charles M Schultz Museum Santa Rosa

Moraga
... see website
St Mary's College Museum of Art
Hearst Art Gallery

Hearst Art Gallery Thumbnail
Sonoma
Mission San Francisco de Solano Museum

featuring the famed watercolor paintings
of the California Missions
by Christian Jorgensen
Mission San Francisco de Solano in Sonoma CA Sonoma
Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

... see website
551 Broadway, Sonoma CA
(707) 939-7862
Sonoma Museum of Art Exterior Thumb
Ukiah
Grace Hudson Museum

... see website
http://www.gracehudsonmuseum.org
Grace Hudson Museum

Bolinas
Bolinas Museum

... see website
featuring their permanent collection,
including Ludmilla and Thadeus Welch,
Arthur William Best, Jack Wisby,
Russell Chatham, Alfred Farnsworth
.

Elizabeth Holland McDaniel Bolinas Embarcadero thumbnail
Walnut Creek
... see website
The Bedford Gallery, Lesher
Center for the Arts
Lesher Ctr for the Arts Walnut Creek CA San Jose
San Jose Museum of Art

... see website
approximately 2,000 20th & 21st
century artworks including paintings, sculpture,
new media, photography, drawings, prints, and artist books.
San Jose Museum of Art Thumbnail
Monterey
Monterey Museum of Art

... see website
Ongoing exhibitions ...
Museums Permanent Collection
including William Ritschel, Armin Hansen
and E. Charlton Fortune

http://www.montereyart.org
Monterey Museum of Art Palo Alto
... see website
Cantor Art Center at Stanford University
Cantor Art Center at Stanford University

Monterey
Salvador Dali Museum

prepurchased tickets required, ... see website

Salvador Dali Museum Monterey Sacramento
Crocker Art Museum
Open Thurs - Sun, 10-5, masks, ... see websites
http://www.crockerartmuseum.org
Sacramento
Capitol Museum

... see website
Governor's Portrait Gallery
Permanent Exhibits

(including one of our galllery's favorite artists,
Robert Rishell's portrait of Gov. Ronald Reagan
Capitol Museum Sacramento Thumbnail Stockton's Treasure!
The Haggin Museum

... see website
-Largest exhibition of Albert Beirstadt paintings anywhere,
plus the works of Joseph Christian Leyendecker,
Norman Rockwell's mentor.
see our Newsletter article, April 2011
Haggin Museum Stockton
Southern California (and Arizona) (for all museums below, see website for hours and protocols.
Los Angeles
Los Angeles Museum of Art

Art of the Americas, Level 3:
Artworks of paintings and sculptures
from the colonial period to World War II—
a survey of of art and culture
& "Levitated Mass"
Los Angeles County Museum of Art Irvine
UCI IMCA
(University of California, Irvine
Institute and Museum of California Art)

(formerly The Irvine Museum)

The Resonant Surface:
Movement, Image and Sound
in California Painting
... through Feb 19, 2022
Irvine Museum Thumbnail
Santa Barbara
The Santa Barbara Museum of Art
Santa Barbara Museum of Art Thumbnail Orange
Our Golden State:
Landscape Paintings
from the Hilbert Collection
November 9 - April 18, 2022

Hilbert Museum, Chapman University

Hilbert Museum Chapman University Orange CA
Pasaden
Norton Simon Museum
-an Impressive Permanent collection,
European impressionist and post impressionist paintings
See our newsletter from March 2014
Norton Simon Museum Pasadena San Marino (near Pasadena)
The Huntington Library

American Art Collection
Paintings by John Singer Sargent,
Edward Hopper, Robert Henri,
Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran,
William Keith, Mary Cassatt,
Thomas Hart Benton and many more.

Huntington Library Art Collection Pasadena
San Diego
San Diego Museum of Art
Permanent Collection
San Diego Museum of Art Thumbnail

Palm Springs
Palm Springs Art Museum

Permanent Collection
American 19th century Landscape Painting

Palm Springs Art Museum Thumbnail
Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix Art Museum
an excellent sampling of
Artists of the American West
Phoenix Art Museum
Los Angeles
California African American Art Museum
adjacent to the LA Coliseum
(see our newsletter articleof their
Ernie Barne's Exhibition September 2019)

California African American Art Museum
& Beyond
Honolulu, HI
Honolulu Museum
(see our Newsletter article
from February, 2015)


Honolulu Museum of Art Kamuela, HI (Big Island)
Issacs Art Center
65-1268 Kawaihae Road
Kamuela, HI  96743
(See our Dec '16 article "Hawaii's Paul Gauguin," 
modernist Madge Tennent, 1889-1972)

Isaacs Art Center
Seattle, WA
Seattle Art Museum
( see our article Mar 2018
French and American Paintings )
Seattle Art Museum Portland, OR
Portland Art Museum

Permanent Collection: American Art
Portland Art Museum Thumbnail
Washington D.C.
The Renwick Gallery

Permanent ... Grand Salon Paintings
from the Smithsonian American Art Museum
Renwick Gallery Washington DC Chicago, IL
Art Institute of Chicago
Permanent collection:
the Impressionists
Art Institute of Chicago Thumbnail
Cedar Rapids, IA
The Cedar Rapids Museum of Art
Grant Wood: In Focus

is an ongoing permanent collection exhibition.
Cedar Rapids Museum of Art

Bentonville, AR
Crystal Bridges
Museum of American Art

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
Washington D.C.
The National Gallery

Permanent collection
American Paintings
Tha National Gallery Washington DC Thumbnail Philadelphia , PA
The Philadelphia Museum of Art
Philadelphia Museum of Art Thumbnail
Philadelphia , PA
Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia Campus
Barnes Foundation Campus Philadelphia Brooklyn, NY
The Brooklyn Museum
American Art
Permanent Collection
The Brooklyn Museum Thumbnail
New York , NY
The Whitney Museum of American Art

Edward Hopper’s New York
Oct 19, 2022 - March 5, 2023

The largest selection of works by Edward Hopper
The Whitney Museum of American Art New York New York , NY
Metropolitan Museum of Art

Its extensive collection of American Art
Metropolitan Museum New York
Detroit, MI
Detroit Institute of Arts
American Art
Permanent Collection
Detroit Institute of Arts Ottawa, Ontario
National Gallery of Canada
Canada National Gallery of Art
Denver, CO
Denver Art Museum
Denver Art Museum Exterior


 

Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery is mostly online. We maintain a gallery showroom (by appointment only) at the Atelier One artist studios building in Graton, California, sharing space with Linda Sorensen's artist studio.

Our newsletter includes reports/articles about artists, museum exhibits, and other arts subjects, often with videos and links.

For the duration of the pandemic, we will observe safe mask wearing and social distance protocols. We do not transact financial business or collect data via our website. All client contact/information is via phone, text, email or in person by appointment.

Daniel Rohlfing
Daniel Rohlfing
For an appointment, email or call ... Art@BodegaBayHeritageGallery.com / 707-875-2911

To view and purchas paintings from us, you may ...



Visit our gallery showroom in GRATON, CA ...


Have us pring selected works to your home ...
Call or email for a an appointment. (up to 200 miles from Bodega Bay).


Or, purchase from our website.
We offer FedEx shipping (included in price) in the U.S. for major purchases. 707-875-2911.

Our Gallery Showroom and Linda Sorensen's Studio in Graton

Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery specializes in Historic California Paintings 1850-1950 and the contemporary art of Linda Sorensen.  Our gallery showroom and Linda's artist studio are open by appointment.  We ask visitors wear masks and practice social distancing. Email, text or call us for an appointment.  As our collection is larger than what we have on display at any one time, we want to learn your interests and preferences. After listing to your wishes, we will have the paintings you want to view ready for your visit.

Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery and Linda Sorensen's studio
Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery .com / Linda Sorensen Paintings . com
Art@BodegaBayHeritageGallery.com / LindaSorensen@Earthlink.net  707-875-2911
Atelier One, Studio 5, 2860 Bowen St, Graton, CA 95444 (not a mailing address)

If you wish to sell a painting to us ...

At present, we are acquiring few paintings. We are interested in considering works by Joshua Meador, or exceptional paintings by a few other Historic California artists. We do not do miscellaneous consignments but do represent artist estates. We do not provide appraisal services.

DO NOT CALL AND EXPECT A THOUGHTFUL ANSWER REGARDING YOUR PAINTING (especially, do not leave a voicemail message requiring us to phone you), ... INSTEAD, Please EMAIL US (Art@BodegaBayHeritageGallery.com) along with a high resolution jpeg image of your painting. Include the name of the artist, its title, dimensions and condition. Please include any history or provenance. Rather than responding off the cuff, in a timely fashion we will read your note, do our homework, and write back and let you know if we wish to acquire your painting or we may give you our our ideas on how best to market your painting through other resources.