Homepage | Current Exhibit | Archives | Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery Monthly
California / American School | Recent Acquisitions | Printbin | Also Available | Artist Friends | Previously Offered
Button Our Artists Button A-B Button C-D Button E-G Button H-He
Button Hi-J Button K-M Button N-P Button Q-S Button T-Z
707-875-2911
Visit the gallery
Justin Faivre
1902 - 1990

Justin Faivre arrived in San Francisco in his late twenties during the Great Depression. He was born in Matthews, Indiana, grew up in Portland where he studied with Howard Ellis, and spent the first few years as a Californian in Los Angeles before making the Bay Area his home.

Justin Faivre Old Bay Farm Island
Old Bay Farm Island


Justin Faivre Hillside Barn Midsized Thumbnail
Hillside with Barn - SOLD

Justin Faivre Goat Rock Midsized Thumbnail
Sonoma Coast
Goat Rock
Justin Faivre Carquienz Field Train and Ship Midsized Thumbnail
Carquinez Strait
Ship Train and Field
Justin Faivre Ocean Beach Midsized Thumbnail
Ocean Beach
Justin Faivre Grazing at Esteros End Midsized Thumbnail
Grazing at Estero's End
Justin Faivre Estuary Docking Midsized Thumbnail
Estuary Docking
Justin Faivre Williamette Vallery Midsized Thumbnail
Williamette Valley
Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery | 1785 Coast Highway One, PO Box 325 Bodega Bay, CA 94923 | 707-875-2911 | Email Us

In 1934, he began exhibiting his oils and watercolors at the Oakland Art Gallery which later to become the Oakland Museum. His first studio was in Oakland and then he settled in Alameda. Faivre's work was greatly influenced by the Society of Six, a group of six Oakland painters influenced by the French Fauvists. The six included Selden Connor Gile, August F. Gay, Maurice Logan, Bernard Von Eichman, William H. Clapp, and Louis Siegriest.

They were known for using textural effects, thick impasto, and rich colors, showing the influence of Paul Cezanne and and Henri Matisse. His subjects included still lifes, landscapes, portraits, and marine scenes. He held memberships in the Society of Western Artists and the Alameda Art Association. Sadly, while in his later years, his shed containing many of his works was burgularized and he died penniless.